CLICK TO CALL
Off: 602.761.2036
fax: 602.812.3482
Frequently Asked Questions
What do I need to bring with me to my first visit?

Patients must bring their insurance card and a form of picture identification. Anyone younger than 18 years old, must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. First-time patients can also visit our patient portal, where you can find helpful for the New Patient Letter, New Patient Forms, Pregnancy Information, Our Policies, and a Map and Directions.
When should I bring my young daughter in for her first Gynecological exam?

It is recommended that young women have their first Gynecologic visit at the age of 13, or when they become sexually active and have questions about contraception and STI’s.
I experience cramping and moodiness during my period. Is there anything that I can do to help with this?

Since Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, or PMDD, is very common for a lot of women, there are a variety of ways to ease its symptoms of bloating, irritability, and moodiness. Women are encouraged to avoid or decrease caffeine intake, limit salt, and to develop a healthy exercise routine, among other things. There are also vitamin supplements that are intended to specifically help with the symptoms of PMDD. If natural methods don’t alleviate your symptoms, there are certain medications that can be prescribed by a physician.
When do I need to start thinking about getting a Mammogram?

Women aged 40 and older should have a mammogram every year. Women with an increased risk of breast cancer due to things such as family history are advised to talk with their physician about whether to have mammograms before the age of 40.
I am experiencing some burning while urination, is there anything to help with the pain?

When dealing with burning urination, it is advised that you increase your fluid intake. Drinking Cranberry Juice has also long been recognized as helpful in alleviating the symptoms of what might be a bladder infection. Women who experience burning while urinating are strongly encouraged to have a urinalysis performed so that the exact problem can be identified and diagnosed. Your gynecologist may then recommend other treatment, or they may decide that the prescription of medicine is the best course of action.
I am experiencing vaginal discharge and some vaginal itching. Could I have an infection?

It’s very common for most women to have some vaginal discharge, which may occur more or less at different times of the month, depending on the individual. However, it is important to note whether or not the vaginal discharge has a foul odor to it, as this may indicate a bacterial infection. Vaginal itching accompanied by a thick, white discharge could potentially indicate a yeast infection. It is advisable to seek out a gynecologist for a simple exam to confirm the diagnosis and for swift, effective treatment, as abnormal vaginal discharge can usually be treated with medication. Vaginal discharge may be a symptom of an STI.
I skipped one of my birth control pills, and I am now experiencing vaginal bleeding. What should I do?

The skipping of just one birth control pill can potentially produce a hormone imbalance, and which can cause a symptom referred to as “breakthrough bleeding.” This is a relatively normal occurrence, and you should take the missed pill as soon as you realize you’ve skipped it. If you have skipped more than two birth control pills, you should use condoms for the remainder of the month.
I missed my period but the pregnancy test is negative. What should I do?

Women who miss a period but find their pregnancy test result to be negative should cautiously monitor the situation, as sometimes something as simple as an increase in stress can cause a woman to miss her period. However, if the same thing happens during the next cycle, you should contact our office to schedule an appointment; you may need to change your birth control.
I’m having problems with constipation. What can I do?

The natural ways to alleviate constipation include, but are not limited to, eating certain foods like apples, bran cereal, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, dried peaches, prunes, raw carrots, and any other high in Fiber foods. Women are also encouraged to increase their water intake to 8 glasses per day. Some medication that can help with constipation includes Fibercon, Dialose, and Miralax, just to name a few.
I recently found a lump in my breast. What should I do?

Women who have found a lump in one of their breasts should contact our office to schedule an appointment for an evaluation.
Birth Control FAQs
There are many unique questions and concerns when discussing birth control methods. We are available to answer all your questions at any time. For any general questions that you may have, here is a short list of commonly asked questions from those who are seeking to learn more about birth control.
Is birth control covered by my insurance? YES.

The Supreme Court stated January 2, 2014 that the PPACA (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) states all group health plans and insurance issuers must provide, without cost-sharing, reproductive preventative care including all FDA-approved contraceptive methods and services, patient education and counseling.
What is the most effective form of birth control?

There are many birth control methods on the market today that are highly effective. The primary methods of birth control available include
Barrier Methods - Generally speaking, barrier methods do not prevent pregnancy as effectively as hormonal methods or IUD’s, and they must be used EVERY TIME that you have sex. Barrier methods Include condoms, sponges, and diaphragms.

Hormonal Methods - Statistically very good at preventing pregnancy. Hormonal methods include birth control pills, shots (Depo-Provera), the vaginal ring, and Nexplanon.

Intrauterine Devices (IUD’s) - IUD’s are inserted into your uterus, work for 5-10 years at a time, and are a generally safe and effective way to prevent pregnancy. The Mirena IUD contains a hormone that can help with heavy periods and cramping.

Natural Family Planning - Also referred to as “fertility awareness,” Natural Family Planning can be effective provided that you and your sexual partner are extremely careful, and are especially mindful of what times of the month are best to engage in sexual activity. Women practicing natural family planning are strongly encouraged to keep good records so as to know when they are fertile; and for times when you ARE fertile, you will need to abstain from sex, or use a barrier method.
With all of this in mind, it’s important to remember that all women are different, and that the best way to find out what method is best for you is by consulting with a licensed healthcare provider.
What are some of the potential side-effects of birth control pills?

Some possible side effects of birth control pills includes nausea, bloating, breast enlargement and tenderness, spotting between periods, decreased sex drive, and migraines. The best way to know which form of birth control will minimize undesirable side-effects is to consult with your healthcare provider.
What if your period doesn’t resume even after you stop taking the birth control pill?

If even after stopping the use of birth control pills you find that you are still not having your period, you may have what is commonly known as post-pill amenorrhea. Typically your period should start again within three months after you stop taking the pill. If after 5-6 months you still haven’t had your period, consult your physician.
Where can I get birth control?

Where you get birth control depends on what method you eventually choose, although it should be noted that regardless of what method of birth control you decide on, it is still highly recommended that you consult with your gynecologist first so that you can get a licensed medical professional’s opinion on what might be the best method for you-
Over The Counter

•Condoms
•Sponges
•Emergency Contraception (If under 15, a prescription is needed)
Prescription

•Oral contraceptives (I.e the pill)
•Vaginal ring
•Skin patch
•Diaphragm (After a fitting with your healthcare provider)
•Shot/injection (Available at your physician’s office)
•IUD (Inserted by a healthcare provider)
•Nexplanon (Inserted by a healthcare provider)
Surgery/Medical Procedures

•Male or female sterilization
Gynecological FAQ's
Frequently Asked Questions
What do I need to bring with me to my first visit?

Patients should bring their insurance card, and for anyone who is younger than 18 years old, we request that a patient or guardian is present in order to discuss parental consent and confidentiality. First-time patients can also visit the New Patients section of our webpage, where you can find helpful links for the New Patient Letter, New Patient Forms, Pregnancy Information, Our Policies, and a Map and Directions.
When should I bring my young daughter in for her first Gynecological exam?

It is recommended that young women have their first Gynecologic visit at the age of 15, or when they become sexually active and have questions about contraception and STI’s.
I experience cramping and moodiness during my period. Is there anything that I can do to help with this?

Since Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, or PMDD, is very common for a lot of women, there are a variety of ways to ease its symptoms of bloating, irritability, and moodiness. Women are encouraged to avoid or decrease caffeine intake, limit salt, and to develop a healthy exercise routine, among other things. There are also vitamin supplements that are intended to specifically help with the symptoms of PMDD. If natural methods don’t alleviate your symptoms, there are certain medications that can be prescribed by a physician.
When do I need to start thinking about getting a Mammogram?

Women aged 40 and older should have a mammogram every year. Women with an increased risk of breast cancer due to things such as family history are advised to talk with their physician about whether to have mammograms before the age of 40.
I am experiencing some burning while urination, is there anything to help with the pain?

When dealing with burning urination, it is advised that you increase your fluid intake. Drinking Cranberry Juice has also long been recognized as helpful in alleviating the symptoms of what might be a bladder infection. Women who experience burning while urinating are strongly encouraged to have a urinalysis performed so that the exact problem can be identified and diagnosed. Your gynecologist may then recommend other treatment, or they may decide that the prescription of medicine is the best course of action.
I am experiencing vaginal discharge and some vaginal itching. Could I have an infection?

It’s very common for most women to have some vaginal discharge, which may occur more or less at different times of the month, depending on the individual. However, it is important to note whether or not the vaginal discharge has a foul odor to it, as this may indicate a bacterial infection. Vaginal itching accompanied by a thick, white discharge could potentially indicate a yeast infection. It is advisable to seek out a gynecologist for a simple exam to confirm the diagnosis and for swift, effective treatment, as abnormal vaginal discharge can usually be treated with medication. Vaginal discharge may be a symptom of an STI.
I skipped one of my birth control pills, and I am now experiencing vaginal bleeding. What should I do?

The skipping of just one birth control pill can potentially produce a hormone imbalance, and which can cause a symptom referred to as “breakthrough bleeding.” This is a relatively normal occurrence, and you should take the missed pill as soon as you realize you’ve skipped it. If you have skipped more than two birth control pills, you should use condoms for the remainder of the month.
I missed my period but the pregnancy test is negative. What should I do?

Women who miss a period but find their pregnancy test result to be negative should cautiously monitor the situation, as sometimes something as simple as an increase in stress can cause a woman to miss her period. However, if the same thing happens during the next cycle, you should contact our office to schedule an appointment; you may need to change your birth control.
I’m having problems with constipation. What can I do?

The natural ways to alleviate constipation include, but are not limited to, eating certain foods like apples, bran cereal, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, dried peaches, prunes, raw carrots, and any other high in Fiber foods. Women are also encouraged to increase their water intake to 8 glasses per day. Some medication that can help with constipation includes Fibercon, Dialose, and Miralax, just to name a few.
I recently found a lump in my breast. What should I do?

Women who have found a lump in one of their breasts should contact our office to schedule an appointment for an evaluation.
Birth Control FAQs
There are many unique questions and concerns when discussing birth control methods. We are available to answer all your questions at any time. For any general questions that you may have, here is a short list of commonly asked questions from those who are seeking to learn more about birth control.
Is birth control covered by my insurance? YES.

The Supreme Court stated January 2, 2014 that the PPACA (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) states all group health plans and insurance issuers must provide, without cost-sharing, reproductive preventative care including all FDA-approved contraceptive methods and services, patient education and counseling.
What is the most effective form of birth control?

There are many birth control methods on the market today that are highly effective. The primary methods of birth control available include
With all of this in mind, it’s important to remember that all women are different, and that the best way to find out what method is best for you is by consulting with a licensed healthcare provider.
What are some of the potential side-effects of birth control pills?

Some possible side effects of birth control pills includes nausea, bloating, breast enlargement and tenderness, spotting between periods, decreased sex drive, and migraines. The best way to know which form of birth control will minimize undesirable side-effects is to consult with your healthcare provider.
What if your period doesn’t resume even after you stop taking the birth control pill?

If even after stopping the use of birth control pills you find that you are still not having your period, you may have what is commonly known as post-pill amenorrhea. Typically your period should start again within three months after you stop taking the pill. If after 5-6 months you still haven’t had your period, consult your physician.
Where can I get birth control?

Where you get birth control depends on what method you eventually choose, although it should be noted that regardless of what method of birth control you decide on, it is still highly recommended that you consult with your gynecologist first so that you can get a licensed medical professional’s opinion on what might be the best method for you-
Over The Counter

•Condoms
•Sponges
•Emergency Contraception (If under 15, a prescription is needed)
Prescription

•Oral contraceptives (I.e the pill)
•Vaginal ring
•Skin patch
•Diaphragm (After a fitting with your healthcare provider)
•Shot/injection (Available at your physician’s office)
•IUD (Inserted by a healthcare provider)
•Nexplanon (Inserted by a healthcare provider)
Surgery/Medical Procedures

•Male or female sterilization
Barrier Methods - Generally speaking, barrier methods do not prevent pregnancy as effectively as hormonal methods or IUD’s, and they must be used EVERY TIME that you have sex. Barrier methods Include condoms, sponges, and diaphragms.

Hormonal Methods - Statistically very good at preventing pregnancy. Hormonal methods include birth control pills, shots (Depo-Provera), the vaginal ring, and Nexplanon.

Intrauterine Devices (IUD’s) - IUD’s are inserted into your uterus, work for 5-10 years at a time, and are a generally safe and effective way to prevent pregnancy. The Mirena IUD contains a hormone that can help with heavy periods and cramping.

Natural Family Planning - Also referred to as “fertility awareness,” Natural Family Planning can be effective provided that you and your sexual partner are extremely careful, and are especially mindful of what times of the month are best to engage in sexual activity. Women practicing natural family planning are strongly encouraged to keep good records so as to know when they are fertile; and for times when you ARE fertile, you will need to abstain from sex, or use a barrier method.


Hablamos español
515 W. Buckeye Road
Suite #207
Phoenix, AZ 85003
515 W. Buckeye Road
Suite #207
Phoenix, AZ 85008


Hablamos español


Hablamos español
TAP TO CALL
Off: 602.761.2036
fax: 602.812.3482
515 W. Buckeye Road
Suite #207
Phoenix, AZ 85008
Let's be Social!



Let's be Social!